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It may well be that the Republicans reposition themselves as the party of the working class, while the Democrats become the party of the professional class (and underclass).

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They leapfrog each other as it is now. The incredibly wealthy use both parties, but typically prefer Republican policies and sometimes Democratic rhetoric. The professional, but not asset rich class prefer policies that benefit work based income, and feel bad for the poor. The working class hate the poor and their bosses. It all lines up.

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I’m a working class man and I don’t hate the poor. My disdain is directed upwards not down. I am aware of the tactics and ploys used to get us to hate the poor, but anyone with common sense can see through that. Poor people aren’t causing the problems in this country, they are a symptom and side effect.

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One also wonders if there is a gender and race based issue here. HR departments are typically more female and more racially diverse than other management departments. The profession is heavily female dominated and seen as a pink collar profession. Is he setting up the usual Republican trope of hard working straight white men against one of the few fields that women and minorities have been able to rise to the C suite?

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author

Actually that isn't true. HR departments are not more racially diverse.

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